Curing Alzheimer’s

I’m sure you haven’t read it, but a while back we did a logical proof comparing schizophrenia and Alzheimer’s. In that post, we logically theorize that schizophrenia and Alzheimer’s are the same disease. And because some people have had remission from Schizophrenia, Alzheimer’s should be curable as well.  

Blind people don’t get schizophrenia. Not one recorded case. The question is why?

Why would people who can’t see be immune to this type of crazy? Because they are immune to vision issues. As we’ve mentioned in multiple other posts, mental strain causes refractive errors and is a symptom of brain entropy. Because the blind never see, they never have the able to see incorrectly, in a way that produces mental strain. Left untreated, this strain can lead to sleep problems, high blood pressure, diabetes, depression, and all sorts of other things including schizophrenia.

So if blind people don’t get schizophrenia, and schizophrenia is Alzheimer’s, could we cure Alzheimer’s with blindfolds? I don’t think it will be that simple, but essentially…yes. 

And why do I think that it will work?

Comas were used decades ago to cure schizophrenia. There were huge risks, but there was some success. Some people died. The rest got really fat.

Many Alzheimer’s patients go into comas before they die. 

People with Alzheimer’s have more mental strain than any other group of people. They are far enough from their equilibrium, that sleep does not help them any more. Stress has been building on them throughout their lives, and they likely have a wide variety of health issues that start in the mind. We’ve shown how high blood pressure, diabetes, kidney disease, and many others all start with the same sort of mental strain.

The biggest issue I see with inducing blindness [in some manner] as a cure, is that all the medication taken by the individual will skew results. The goal here is to essentially zero out the brain, and that is impossible with drugs in your system. So the less meds the better. 

Twenty-four hours without sight should be enough to gauge results. If you start seeing improvement, continue as needed. If you decide to try this with yourself or a family member, please remember that nothing we’re doing here can do any permanent damage to your eyes or brain. You still have a fully functional brain. You always have.

Check out this study. The shotgun approach actually worked for UCLA. You can read their notes on it. They have no idea why. They had their subjects diet and exercise, go to counseling, and worked on stress management. Here’s why it worked:

Because they finally started addressing some of the major issues at the root of the disease. As they lowered their stress levels and improved their diets, they began to finally move the needle on the patients brains. The major difference not mentioned in this study, keeping these patients from true equilibrium is their eyesight. It’s really just a symptom of brain distortion, but it makes it much harder to stay healthy if you try to operate without your barometer.

There’s never going to be a pill or vaccination to cure Alzheimer’s. The answer lies within you. 

Here’s your Alzheimer’s Protocol:

  1. Go outside
  2. Move
  3. Relax
  4. See better
  5. No meds
  6. Doubt your fears
  7. Do something new
  8. Talk to a counselor
  9. Blindfold yourself

Sources:

  1. https://www.sciencefriday.com/articles/from-fever-cure-to-coma-therapy-psychiatric-treatments-through-time/
  2. https://www.brightfocus.org/alzheimers/symptoms-and-stages
  3. https://www.webmd.com/brain/coma-types-causes-treatments-prognosis#3
  4. https://qz.com/977133/a-ucla-study-shows-there-could-be-a-cure-for-alzheimers-disease/

Huntington’s is not genetic

Even doctors admit that it’s hard to distinguish between Huntington’s, Parkinson’s, and Alzheimer’s. Here’s an article saying that treatment for one of these diseases may work for the other two. 

Some researchers and physicians consider the differentiation between cortical and sub-cortical dementia important for patient diagnosis, but others remain skeptical that a significant difference exists. The major criticism of the studies that show variation between cortical and sub-cortical dementias is that there is pathological overlap between the sample groups that are used to model the two categories. These studies often assume that Alzheimer’s patients mostly have cortical dementia and HD or Parkinson’s patients preferentially exhibit subcortical dementia. Necropsies have shown, however, that the brains of both Alzheimer’s and HD patients exhibit a certain degree of both categories of dementia.

If in fact both cortical and subcortical dementia occur in Alzheimer’s, HD, and Parkinson’s patients, then these studies may be problematic. As a result, physicians are still trying to learn more about the differences between the pathologies of the diseases in hopes of finding a more reliable way of differentiating dementias. The ability to differentiate dementias may lead researchers and physicians to better diagnose and treat neurodegenerative diseases. [Source]

We’re going to go through the symptoms, but if you’ve been reading, you know how this goes.

So first, here are the symptoms:

Cognitive: amnesia, delusion, lack of concentration, memory loss, mental confusion, slowness in activity, or difficulty thinking and understanding

Muscular: abnormality walking, increased muscle activity, involuntary movements, problems with coordination, loss of muscle, or muscle spasms

Behavioral: compulsive behavior, fidgeting, irritability, or lack of restraint

Psychological: delirium, depression, hallucination, or paranoia

Mood: anxiety, apathy, or mood swings

Also common: tremor, weight loss, or impaired voice

Those look familiar. Are there any symptoms that aren’t covered between Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, and schizophrenia? 

“For most diseases, symptoms will vary from person to person. People with the same disease may not have all the symptoms listed.” Wait…what? I thought the symptoms were the only things separating this from the other diseases?

And is it really genetic? It’s complicated, but the consensus is yes. Even though 10% of cases are “due to a new mutation.” But what about that field of epigenetics that basically says that your genes can change over time? Here’s the unabridged version.

HD is typically inherited from a person’s parents, although up to 10% of cases are due to a new mutation. The disease is caused by an autosomal dominant mutation in either of an individual’s two copies of a gene called Huntingtin. This means a child of an affected person typically has a 50% chance of inheriting the disease. The Huntingtin gene provides the genetic information for a protein that is also called “huntingtin”. Expansion of CAG (cytosine-adenine-guanine) triplet repeats in the gene coding for the Huntingtin protein results in an abnormal protein, which gradually damages cells in the brain, through mechanisms that are not fully understood. Diagnosis is by genetic testing, which can be carried out at any time, regardless of whether or not symptoms are present. This fact raises several ethical debates: the age at which an individual is considered mature enough to choose testing; whether parents have the right to have their children tested; and managing confidentiality and disclosure of test results.

This segment is made up of a series of three DNA building blocks (cytosine, adenine, and guanine) that appear multiple times in a row. Normally, the CAG segment is repeated 10 to 35 times within the gene. In people with Huntington disease, the CAG segment is repeated 36 to more than 120 times. People with 36 to 39 CAG repeats may or may not develop the signs and symptoms of Huntington disease, while people with 40 or more repeats almost always develop the disorder.

So if you have 27-39 repeats of this code you may or may not get the disease. But if you have 40 or more repeats, you almost always get the disorder. Wait…almost always? So you’re saying even the hard science isn’t foolproof.

The number of CAG repeats in an HD gene can be unstable when the gene is passed on to the next generation. That means the number of CAG repeats can increase or decrease when the gene is passed from parent to child. Wait, it varies from generation to generation? In the sole aspect that we’re using to call it genetic?

Older fathers are more likely to pass along the extended copy of this gene. We’ve talked about aging parents several times before. We know that the age of mothers closely correlates to Down Syndrome, while the age of fathers closely correlates to Dwarfism.

I have a question for you. How often do we test people with dementia for this CAG repeat? I’m guessing there is not much reason to test for Huntington’s when there is no family history. 

So in summary, here’s why I don’t think Huntington’s disease is genetic:

  • 10% of cases are “random” mutations
  • Even the hard science is not absolute
  • It gets more probable with aging dad’s
  • Epigenetics. Our genes change over time.

So if it is not genetic, then it is practically indistinguishable from Alzheimers and Parkinson’s.

Did science get it wrong? Maybe so. I think that a bunch of guys spent their lives studying batches of symptoms, it was the least we could do to name these batches of symptoms after them. All the other fields of science do it. Here’s the problem, the more classifications did not lead to more knowledge in this case. Because the symptoms are indistinguishable.

Sources:

  1. https://rarediseases.info.nih.gov/diseases/6677/huntington-disease
  2. https://en.hdbuzz.net/027
  3. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3140172/
  4. https://www.alz.org/dementia/huntingtons-disease-symptoms.asp
  5. http://hdsa.org/what-is-hd/
  6. https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/huntingtons-disease/diagnosis-treatment/drc-20356122

Alzheimer’s is curable

Let’s start somewhere else. With a disease that we’ve made some progress on: schizophrenia.

Here are your symptoms:

Behavioral: social isolation, disorganized behavior, aggression, agitation, compulsive behavior, excitability, hostility, repetitive movements, self-harm, or lack of restraint

Cognitive: thought disorder, delusion, amnesia, belief that an ordinary event has special and personal meaning, belief that thoughts aren’t one’s own, disorientation, memory loss, mental confusion, slowness in activity, or false belief of superiority

Mood: anger, anxiety, apathy, feeling detached from self, general discontent, loss of interest or pleasure in activities, elevated mood, or inappropriate emotional response

Psychological: hallucination, paranoia, hearing voices, depression, fear, persecutory delusion, or religious delusion

Speech: circumstantial speech, incoherent speech, rapid and frenzied speaking, or speech disorder

Also common: fatigue, impaired motor coordination, or lack of emotional response

Onset Age: 12-40 [source]

Treatment: Antipsychotics. They seem to help alleviate symptoms, both positive and negative.

Wow. I thought I was reading an article about Alzheimer’s. You are. Bear with me.

Alzheimer’s symptoms:

Behavioral: aggression, agitation, difficulty with self care, irritability, meaningless repetition of own words, personality changes, restlessness, lack of restraint, or wandering and getting lost

Cognitive: mental decline, difficulty thinking and understanding, confusion in the evening hours, delusion, disorientation, forgetfulness, making things up, mental confusion, difficulty concentrating, inability to create new memories, inability to do simple math, or inability to recognize common things

Mood: anger, apathy, general discontent, loneliness, or mood swings
Psychological: depression, hallucination, or paranoia
Also common: inability to combine muscle movements, jumbled speech, or loss of
appetite

Onset Age: 41+

Treatment: Cholinesterase inhibitors and. Memantine. The inhibitors slow the process that breaks down a key neurotransmitter. Memantine regulates the neurotransmitter responsible for learning and memory.

The main difference in this article is memory loss. That’s the main symptom difference that we can’t explain between schizophrenia and Alzheimer’s. You know what else changes in those onset ages? The subjects ages. And while I have my own theories for why, I think it’s save to say that people start losing their memory as they get older. These diseases effect the same areas of the brain.

Here are some results from an exhaustive study comparing symptoms of Elderly Schizophrenics [ED] to those with Alzheimer’s in the annesiac mild cognitive impairment stage [AD-aMCI]. Take a look at the data here, and read the entire study if you dare. The point is these numbers are practically indistinguishable.

Test/subtest ES group AD-aMCI group p value
WMS-R
GM index 80.0 ± 16.2 77.8 ± 10.5 0.58
AC index 91.0 ± 14.7 98.6 ± 11.7 0.046
DR index 76.3 ± 17.2 58.8 ± 8.6 <0.001
GM-DR 3.6 ± 10.7 19.9 ± 8.6 <0.001

WAIS-R
Information 10.1 ± 3.7 11.2 ± 2.8 0.37
Digit symbol substitution 8.0 ± 2.7 11.6 ± 2.3 <0.001
Similarity 9.9 ± 3.2 12.5 ± 2.2 0.024
Picture completion 8.5 ± 4.0 11.2 ± 1.8 0.037
Block design 8.4 ± 2.7 11.5 ± 1.9 0.0018

We don’t know much about the brain. And the nature of science is to broaden fields. To specify. This is about simplification. 

We’ve even used the same treatment and gotten similar results. 

Here’s the theory: these are the same disease. We call schizophrenia Alzheimer’s after you turn forty. Assume for a moment that I’m right. That these are the same disease.

We’ve made progress on schizophrenia. Some people with schizophrenia have made full recoveries. So if Alzheimer’s is schizophrenia, then Alzheimer’s is curable.

There is hope after all.

So how do we cure schizophrenia? We don’t treat symptoms. Some people say that theirs is in “remission” but they only say that because of how we convey the nature of the disease.

So, if for whatever reason, you’re still with me. Alzheimer’s and Schizophrenia are the same disease. How can I say that they are curable? It’s the nature of the human mind. It has all the same hardware it had when you were born. It’s perfectly designed and capable of a full recovery. 

Here is the brain model that lead me to these solutions.

 

 

 

 

Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s

I know that these are very serious conditions, and I mean no disrespect to anyone who’s either battling these or other neurological diseases, or their families or friends. What’s important here though is to look at these diseases from a broader perspective, and perhaps see things from a different point of view.  I only want to help.

Yeah. I lumped them together. Why? Keep reading.

Here’s what we know:

  • Old people get it
  • There are no cures
  • They seem to lose their minds
  • They do not sleep well
  • Diet and Exercise may help
  • Early life Depression has a strong correlation
  • A bunch of fun medical terms I choose to ignore.
  • They are not genetic.

Hypothesis, it’s either us prolonging the life of someone who is essentially brain dead, or they have fried their brain on a system that we’ve discussed previously. They have so many brain problems treated by medications with so many side effects, vision problems, that this one is going to be hard to parse through. What I’m starting to think now is that we have a fancy name for a lot of different diseases, but what sets this apart from dementia?

In reading about both of these diseases, they have several progressive stages of each disease. Worth noting, is that medicine and research have no absolute timeline in either disease. “Some cases progress from stage one to two in months, and some take years.” “Each person experiences these stages differently. ” What this means to me is that we have no idea about either one of these diseases, we only treat symptoms.

The premise is easy though: our minds are perfect, because our eyes are perfect. We create our own misery.

So if this is true, and we know what causes aging and how to prevent it, what does it matter what different flavors we have of losing your mind. We so many different neurological diseases, perhaps a broader view grouping symptoms and diseases together will help us gain some ground. I read somewhere that some of these diseases are practically indistinguishable. Maybe it’s a mixture of meds on a mind weaker with age and refractive error. If we can reverse refractive error, we can save the mind from itself and help it find its preferred resting place: peace.

So guess what: we’re never going to find a “cure” for these illnesses. The only true solution lies within.

Source: http://theconversation.com/what-causes-alzheimers-disease-what-we-know-dont-know-and-suspect-75847