Solving the Pecten: The Reverse Photoelectric Effect

We’ve shown how birds use their seventh sense to navigate, and shown how it may be why they fly into windows. One question we haven’t answered is how does it work. Any answer to this question must determine the use of the pecten, the mysterious vascular structure at the back of the avian eye.

The opposite of the photoelectric effect is X-Ray production. Just take a look at an X-Ray producing apparatus next to the eye of a bird. They look remarkably similar. Not only that, but the physics that produces X-Rays could produce the seventh sense.

The eye is the tube. The pecten is the anode target. Light would create the heat, current, and voltage.

X-rays can be generated by an X-ray tube, a vacuum tube that uses a high voltage to accelerate the electrons released by a hot cathode to a high velocity. The high velocity electrons collide with a metal target, the anode, creating the X-rays.

It’s worth noting that UV light is one step below X-Rays on energy. Meaning, if we lower the energy of the input, the output would be lower as well. And this means that the process would produce the expected wavelength of rays.

E=pc

E=hf thus pc=hf

p=\frac{hf}{c} and f=\frac{1}{\lambda}

Thus E=\frac{hc}{\lambda}

So if the energy goes down, what happens to \lambda? It increases. Frequency decreases. That’s exactly what we anticipated!

The pecten is a comb-like structure of blood vessels belonging to the choroid in the eye of a bird. It is a non-sensory, pigmented structure that projects into the vitreous body from the point where the optic nerve enters the eyeball.

How does this produce a charge? The pigment makes sense. That would absorb light. But how does this structure act as the anode? The light creates current in the eye. And the pecten structure absorbs this light, but is also affected by the current. So the pecten itself becomes charged by the field it sits in. The particles it moves to cool and nourish the eye, become charged so that as the photons enter, they scatter UV radiation back through the eye.

We’ve shown how current in the eye helps us balance, and effects photo-epilepsy, it would also orient the cells on the pecten in a polarizing fashion. The positively charged side would face the front of the eye. And that’s what the anode does in x-ray production. So the light charges the eye, polarizes the nourishing pecten, and uses the pecten as an anode to fuel the bird’s seventh sense of ultraviolet production.

Sources:

  1. https://www.graduate.umaryland.edu/gsa/gazette/February-2016/How-the-human-body-uses-electricity/
  2. http://www.sprawls.org/ppmi2/XRAYPRO/#THE%20X-RAY%20TUBE
  3. https://www.radiologymasterclass.co.uk/tutorials/physics/x-ray_physics_production
  4. https://physics.info/x-ray/
  5. https://www.ccohs.ca/oshanswers/phys_agents/ultravioletradiation.html
  6. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blood_vessel
  7. https://campus.murraystate.edu/faculty/tderting/anatomyatlas/salee_shaw/hawkinstruc.html
  8. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heel_effect
  9. https://www.orau.org/ptp/collection/xraytubescoolidge/coolidgeinformation.htm
  10. https://www.semanticscholar.org/paper/The-effect-of-intraocular-ablation-of-the-pecten-of-Brach/bad2d891e6630529b47b7ce8fa1d89285d8c1258

Unnatural Disaster: Why Birds Crash into Glass

You’ve seen or heard about this. We even have safety protocols in place to protect the flying creatures. But something just doesn’t add up: How can the animals with the best vision in the animal kingdom not sense when they are about to fly into a window?

If they use their UV sense to navigate, it’s possible that the UV light would shine through the window, instead of being reflected by it. This would keep the birds from flying into the side of the house, but would make them more prone to fly into windows. 

We know that they don’t just fly into the side of solid structures. So it’s not a navigation issue. What types of glass ward off bird crashes? In looking at the recommended solutions to this issue, one thing is clear [no pun intended]: the glass has lost its uniform transparency. The manufacturers are essentially just breaking up the glass into smaller sections. The section breaks are visible. They have an entire lab dedicated to testing these window setups, so we know they work. We just don’t know why.

Solid objects absorb photons. Clear objects allow them to pass through. Thus, the clear objects don’t behave like solid objects in respect to this sense. They behave almost exactly like empty space. 

If birds use a sense that we haven’t discovered yet to navigate, it would make flight much easier. If they can see this portion of their sight, they can essentially avoid flying into things with unbelievable precision. But when we introduce transparent objects into the natural world that don’t react with light like ordinary objects, the creatures with the best eyesight on the planet can fall victim to a pane of glass.

Sources: 

  1. https://abcbirds.org/get-involved/bird-smart-glass/
  2. https://www.allaboutbirds.org/why-birds-hit-windows-and-how-you-can-help-prevent-it/
  3. https://www.cachevalleydaily.com/news/archive/2019/06/20/usu-professor-says-window-collisions-kill-nearly-a-billion-birds-a-year/#.XSIiuS2ZPSw
  4. https://earthsky.org/earth/why-do-birds-collide-with-windows

 

The Mighty UV: Birds Use Ultraviolet Emission to Navigate

There are good reasons why birds fly in a “V” pattern. But how do they do it? 

With our Seventh Sense theory, most animals have the ability to emit ultraviolet rays. But we know that birds can see in ultraviolet. So if they can see in ultraviolet, that means they should be able to see other birds 7th Sense. It’s essentially gaze detection on steroids.

Why do I think this is true? Personal experience. When I was incapacitated with anxiety, I noticed something else that was strange: birds would fly in front of my car. I know what you’re thinking: so what, that happens to everyone. Let’s just say it wasn’t uncommon for ten birds to fly in front of my car in a five minute span. Naturally, I began to ask myself if I was possibly causing this. But if I can emit UV rays, they would be able to see them.

If birds can see these UV rays, can they use them to stay in line on these long flights?

I think so. If you use the lead bird as a reference point, each subsequent bird locks one eye on the bird in front of them, and the other on the path ahead. Birds eyes are fixed, but this sense is not. With this UV gridlock pattern, the birds can easily stay in their lanes, and check to see if someone is off course. Imagine me holding a laser pointer telling you where to stand for a hike. It makes it super simple. Not only that, it helps explain the precision in which they do it. 

In a “V”, the birds maximize aerodynamics and visibility, using their seventh sense of UV detection and emission to align their formations with precision.

Sources:

  1. https://www.nwf.org/Magazines/National-Wildlife/2012/AugSept/Animals/Bird-Vision
  2. https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/07/160712093355.htm
  3. https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2014/01/why-birds-fly-v-formation
  4. https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/03/130307092340.htm
  5. https://www.nationalgeographic.com/science/phenomena/2014/01/15/birds-that-fly-in-a-v-formation-use-an-amazing-trick/
  6. https://elifesciences.org/articles/45071
  7. https://link.springer.com/article/10.1186/s40657-017-0092-3
  8. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1690328/