Flipping Hitchen’s Razor

Hitchens’s razor is an epistemological razor expressed by writer Christopher Hitchens. It says that the burden of proof regarding the truthfulness of a claim lies with the one who makes the claim; if this burden is not met, then the claim is unfounded, and its opponents need not argue further in order to dismiss it.

Hitchens has phrased the razor in writing as “What can be asserted without evidence can also be dismissed without evidence.” But atheism is presented without evidence. Thus, using Hitchen’s own protocol we can dismiss atheism.

The main rejection to this will likely be that atheism is not making a claim, so there is no burden of proof. Which is the only way that the atheist can accept atheism without any evidence and be epistemologically consistent.

The phrase “God exists” is either true or false, and atheistic worldviews do not include a God. So I think we can reasonably conclude that atheists believe that God doesn’t exist, whether or not they care to defend that position with evidence.

Why is God good?

If you accept the Bible as true, this is a natural conclusion. But do we need the Bible deduce this? I don’t think so.

In theism, we accept that God is the first, uncaused cause. God is an independent thing. God is the source of all contingent or dependent things.

Evil is a dependent thing. Evil requires good. Without good, we would know no evil. It is simply a privation of good. An absence.

Therefore, if God is independent and evil is dependent, God is good.

Deja Vu Revisited

Not long ago, I presented a theory about how deja vu could prove that a personal and omniscient god exists. This theory does a little more, though.

If two-thirds of people experience deja vu, that means that essentially each person has either had a personal experience with God, or knows someone that has. Which essentially solve the problem of divine hiddenness. Because if every person either had a religious experience or knew someone that had, the problem of divine hiddenness is not a problem at all.